First Look: Jessica Chastain in “Crimson Peak”

Entertainment Weekly published on this week issue the first official look of Jessica on Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak! To the magazine, Jessica talked a little about the film:

It was really draining, emotionally and spiritually. The experience took more out of me than enything I’d ever done. When I finished I had to take some time off.

Check HQ scans in our gallery:

“The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby” DVD/Blu-Ray Release Date

The DVD/Blu-Ray release date for ‘The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby‘ was announced. It will be available on digital download on January 23, 2015 before heading to DVD, Blu-Ray™ and On Demand February 3, 2015. Both the DVD and Blu-Ray™ include bonus films, THE DISAPPEARANCE OF ELEANOR RIGBY: HIM and THE DISAPPEARANCE OF ELEANOR RIGBY: HER, giving the consumer the complete picture of the story as it was intended to be seen. The film has a running time of 123 minutes and is rated R for language.

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Read the full announcement on Awards Circuit.

Jessica talks “A Most Violent Year”, “Crimson Peak” and more

In a new interview to Indiewire, Jessica talks about A Most Violent Year, the crazy press schedule for Interstellar, her love for Crimson Peak… and all before flying to Budapest to shoot The Martian. Busy bee!

With “Interstellar” you did the biggest press tour you’ve ever done in your life.
I never had a press tour like that. I’ve never been in a movie that big. We had four premieres. And each city we went to we had TV junkets and it was a complicated thing for me to talk about. You’re not supposed to give away spoilers. It was an interesting experience. It’s such a huge press tour for a film that you’re not really allowed to talk about.

You shot “A Most Violent Year” while you shot “Crimson Peak,” right?
Oh my gosh. Flying back and forth to Toronto. I don’t think I’ll ever repeat that. I’m glad I did it because if I hadn’t done it, I would never have been in this film, and I love it so much. Wait until you see “Crimson Peak” because these characters are so different. I’m the English governess in it. A completely different energy.

You use a lot of interviews as a platform to demand for better roles for women in film, but it’s clear you’re managing to find them. Is it just luck?
I’m lucky. When I speak out I’m not doing it from a selfish place because I get incredible opportunities. I get incredible roles and experiences with these wonderful filmmakers. I’m speaking out as an audience member who is going to the cinema and noticing there’s a problem here because I don’t see women being represented. I don’t see Asian-American actresses begin represented. I don’t see women in their 60s being represented in film. I want to see incredible actresses like Sarah Paulson and Lily Rabe in movies. There are these really fantastic actresses out there, but there are so few opportunities.

You’re one of the most outspoken actresses working in Hollywood today. Did you have a really strong female role model growing up?
For me, it’s more like, I always root for voices in society. There are groups of people that have, growing up, felt like they don’t have a voice. And I don’t think that’s right. I recently did an interview with, and I love him so much, Xavier Dolan, and he said that beautiful thing at Cannes about Jane Campion. He said that growing up as a gay man, he kind of connected to women because of a need to be heard. Everyone wants to be seen and to be heard. And that’s what I want to fight for. That’s why I talk about Asian American actors or African American women. I’m an audience member first, and when I go to see a movie, I want to see the voices of everyone.

Read the full interview at Indiewire’s website.

Jessica receives London Film Critics Nomination

The London Film Critics’ Circle has announced the nominations for its 35th annual awards ceremony and, once again, Jessica received a supporting actress nomination for her work in A Most Violent Year – which got another nomination to Kasia Walicka-Maimone for Technical Achievement Award in costumes.

SUPPORTING ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Patricia Arquette – Boyhood
Marion Bailey – Mr Turner
Jessica Chastain – A Most Violent Year
Agata Kulesza – Ida
Emma Stone – Birdman

The winners will be announced at a ceremony on Sunday 18 January 2015 at The May Fair Hotel.

Jessica receives “Critics’ Choice” Nomination

The nominees for 2015 Critics’ Choice Awards were revealed and Jessica was nominated as Best Supporting Actress for her work in “A Most Violent Year“, alongside the already announced MVP in Films. It was the only nomination for Jessica and for A Most Violent Year, but Interstellar received 7 nominations including Best Young Actress to lovely Mackenzie Foy, Best Cinematography and Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Patricia Arquette – Boyhood
Jessica Chastain – A Most Violent Year
Keira Knightley – The Imitation Game
Emma Stone – Birdman
Meryl Streep – Into the Woods
Tilda Swinton – Snowpiercer

The show will be broadcast live on A&E from the iconic Hollywood Palladium on January 15th at 9PM!

InStyle January 2015 – Photoshoot

New Interview About ‘A Most Violent Year’

Indiewire has published a great interview with Jessica about A Most Violent Year:

So often in the crime drama, female characters are relegated to these smaller, secondary roles. But your character here is much more than that. Can you talk about building a figure that is actually much greater than the usual moll or femme fatale?
A lot of credit goes to J.C. [Chandor], the writer. When he first sent me the script, the thing I said to him was, “You know what? I just have this idea for her, for what you wrote. Of course, I’m sure you’ve never thought about this. To me, she feels like Dick Cheney. I’d love to explore that more with her.” I love the idea that, in this film, you underestimate her. It’s fun playing a character that is underestimated. You see her putting makeup on, you think, “Okay, this is the ‘wife’ of this crime thriller.” But then you realize, “Oh, no, she’s a lot more than that.”

One of the interesting things about that misconception is that it plays a lot into the gender politics between her and Oscar Isaac’s character. What do you think that element of the film reflects about 1981, or about today?
Well, in 1981, it was absolutely a man’s world in New York City. You feel some change coming to the world, because you have the granddaughter [Annie Funke] starting to take control of the other heating oil business. But for sure when Anna — in 1970, maybe? — when her father gave the company to her husband… in 1970 in New York City, it wouldn’t have been very common for a woman to run that business. Thank God we’ve gone forward! Of course I don’t think we’ve gone far enough, and we have some ways to go, but J.C. shows the sexism in it. She’s a woman, she’s very smart, and she realizes she needs to use what tools she has when she can. And that even means when she’s going to the bankers’ dinner, she’s going to wear a very revealing dress, because that is her tool in a man’s world. I think he’s a very smart writer, J.C. His brain is crazy!

In developing your character, were there any specific influences from crime fiction, or elsewhere? Of course there’s the staple: Lady Macbeth.
It’s interesting. A lot of people mention Lady Macbeth because she’s the go-to when you think of a strong female character with a husband. But the problem with that is that Lady Macbeth goes crazy. Anna doesn’t. Anna is very comfortable doing what she’s doing. And she has no qualms about it! She has no regrets. She actually feels that’s the way things need to be done. So that is the difference. I can say yes to Lady Macbeth in that she is a woman who is inspiring her husband to be larger and bigger than he even thinks is possible. He’s her king. But she never regrets what she does.

What’s interesting is that in a movie filled with physically large, gun-wielding men, your character is the most intimidating character in the film. I don’t know if you consider yourself an intimidating person—
Oh, I hope not! [Laughs]

Read the full interview on Indiewire.

“A Most Violent Year” New Posters & Images

Jessica Chastain Named 2014’s MVP of Film


Jessica, alongside Kevin Costner and Ron Howard, will receive special awards at the 20th Critics’ Choice Movie Awards, the Broadcast Film Critics’ Association, which hosts the event, announced on Friday. The honors were determined by the BFCA’s executive committee and will be presented during the Critics’ Choice Awards ceremony on Jan. 15. A&E will broadcast the awards nationally.

She will receive the first-ever Critics’ Choice MVP Award in recognition of the breadth of her accomplishments in 2014, which include outstanding leading performances in Ned Benson’s The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them and Liv Ullmann’s Miss Julie and supporting performances in Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar and J.C. Chandor’s A Most Violent Year. The honor will annually celebrate “one extraordinary actor for his/her standout work in several movies throughout a single year.

The nominees for the Critics’ Choice Awards will be announced on Dec. 15.

Jessica receives a Golden Globes nomination!

The nominees for the 72nd annual Golden Globe awards were announced on Thursday morning, and once again Jessica received a nomination for Best Supporting Actress in a motion picture for her work on A Most Violent Year! She share the category with fellow nominees Keira Knightley, Patricia Arquette, Emma Stone and Meryl Streep.

She released a short statement on her twitter after hearing about her nomination:

Today is a great day! Thank you so much to the HFPA for this tremendous honor. It was an absolute pleasure working with J.C. Chandor and my dear dear friend Oscar Isaac on this special film. I’m thrilled to see the work we did together honored. #AMostViolentYear #GoldenGlobes.

Hans Zimmer also received a nomination for Best Original Score, for Interstellar.

The 72nd Golden Globe Awards will be held in Beverly Hills on January 11, 2015