Welcome to Jessica Chastain Network, the original and most complete fansite dedicated to Oscar nominated actress Jessica Chastain.
You may know Jessica from her roles in movies as Take Shelter, Coriolanus, Mama, Lawless, or the acclaimed Tree of Life, Zero Dark Thirty and The Help.

Jessica has first appeared on the public eyes during 2011 Cannes, when a very shy and beautiful redhead was being guided by Brad Pitt and Sean Penn on the red carpet. In a few months her career exploded, with seven movies being released in sequel and her first Oscar nomination coming right after. Today, it's nearly impossible you never have heard about her.

Our goal is to provide fans an up to date source for Miss Chastain with news, a comprehensive content, and a picture gallery with over 30.000 paparazzi free pictures and counting. Thank you for visiting!
20
May

The Hollywood Reporter – The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them had its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival on May 17, bringing back together director Ned Benson and stars Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy and Jess Weixler. For the trio, it’s not just a reunion of the cast but a reunion of friends.

The actresses and director forged their bonds of friendship over more than a decade. Chastain and Weixler became friends when they both studied at Juilliard, and Chastain and Benson met long before she became a star for her work in Tree of Life and Zero Dark Thirty.

Chastain had even attended the Berlin Film Festival with Weixler when the Good Wife actress had a film, Teeth, in the fest.

“Jess is like my sister in real life,” says Chastain. “She went to the Berlin Film Festival, and I went to the festival with her, and I carried her coat on the red carpet and supported her.”

And then it reversed when Weixler went with Chastain to Cannes for the first time two years ago.

“When I came here for Tree of Life, she videotaped me on the red carpet,” Chastain says with a smile.

13
May

The New York Times has today an interview with director Ned Benson, in which he talks about his three movie projects The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Him, Her and Them, specially the last one which is the one to be screening in Cannes this week.

Q. What inspired the “different perspective” approach?
A. I had written the “Him” part as a script for a movie just before I met Jessica Chastain and became friendly with her. I told her about it, and she asked me lots of questions about the female character: Why did she do this? What did she feel? I thought about all that, and that there was obviously another perspective on the story I had written. So it was organic in a way; I started writing a second script based on getting that other look at the relationship. It wasn’t as if I had a big concept idea about it first. Afterward I became really excited about it, because I don’t think anything quite like this has been done.

Q. It’s not exactly a commercial idea. How hard was it to raise money and to find distributors?
A. It was very hard to raise money. I was 28 when I started writing “Him” — I am 37 now, so that gives you some idea. But Jessica became well known around the time we were working on the second script, and that helped. There were people who were interested in the idea, but terrified to take the risk. I am an unknown director; who knows if I could make one film, let alone two?

Q. How did you plan the filming of “Him” and “Her”? Did you shoot them separately?
A. We didn’t shoot the films separately, although we were always very clear about which scene was for which film. We did it by character.
The first week I spent with James [McAvoy] and Ciaran Hinds, who plays his dad, and shot their whole story. The second week, we did the stuff that shows the early part of Jessica and James’s relationship. And so on. Some scenes are the same in both movies, but they show either his version of what happened or hers. The actors were amazing because you had to approach those scenes in two ways; first as you see it, and then as the other character is seeing you.

Make sure to visit The New York Times to read the whole interview, it’s very interesting. A version of this special report appears in print on May 14, 2014, in The International New York Times.

24
Apr

Time unveiled their 2014 Most Influential People list and Lawless/Zero Dark Thirty producer Megan Ellis is among them. The personality chosen to write a tribute was, obviously, her friend Jessica.

Hollywood’s powerful wunderkind

The Italian Renaissance flourished because patrons like the Medici family sponsored artists and valued their craft. Today the film industry has been blessed with a modern version of the Medicis — a single benefactor who has the utmost respect for cinema: Megan Ellison.

I first met Megan on the set of Lawless in 2011 and quickly discovered her love of cinema. Her Annapurna Pictures produces daringly original films driven by visionaries, including Zero Dark Thirty, True Grit, The Master, American Hustle and Her. They have earned a total of 35 Academy Award nominations, and she is the first female producer to earn two Best Picture nominations in the same year. Oh, and she’s only 28.

Megan is not only changing the direction our industry is going in, she’s also enriching our culture. Where would we be without Lorenzo the Magnificent supporting Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo? I’m glad that we’ll never have to know.

Chastain is an Academy Award–nominated actress

9
Dec

It seems Amy Adams is turned into a Chastainer, like us all.

Reading a bit of her Vanity Fair covershoot interview, she did a brief mention on Jessica, naming her “One of the most amazing actress”. Now, on her most recent interview to New York Times, she was more specific:

Mammoth superhero franchises aside, if she had her choice of future projects, she’d collaborate with the actor Jessica Chastain, whom she said she adores.

“I want to find something where we can play sisters,” she said. “We can do a chain thing: You write one scene, I’ll write another, and we’ll send it back and forth while I’m doing ‘Superman.’ ”

I’m all open to it, what about you?

23
Nov

chastain-redford

Jessica Chastain on Robert Redford as Our Man in “All Is Lost”

Robert Redford acts without speaking. That is some sort of magic.

Mr. Redford has given many of my favorite performances in his over-50-year career. In “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” “All the President’s Men,” “The Way We Were,” and so many others, he has entertained us while always stirring an emotion within us. He has helped shape this industry through his work and mastery, while at the same time supporting new artists. He is a film legend.

And yet, as I sat watching him play the sole character, Our Man in J.C. Chandor’s, “All Is Lost,” I forgot that this is Robert Redford. He is fully the character: a man lost at sea, willing to survive. I was struck by his physical and emotional endurance, but moreover, I was struck by his lack of dialogue. How does an actor bring us a complete character without dialogue? Mr. Redford is absolutely riveting in “All Is Lost.”

He brings us forward with his silence. Having to convey much of the story through body language, he gives himself freedom to express his emotions fully.

There’s a great immediacy in his acting. He’s not confined to the expected boundaries of cinema. He is an actor who exists only in the moment, an actor who is never self-conscious. We feel his character’s secrets, without knowing them completely. He goes straight to the feeling and his story hits you, like music. Like it has for over 50 years. That is magic.

(Chastain was nominated by the Academy for “Zero Dark Thirty” and “The Help.”)

- Source

7
Oct

In her new column on the Oscar race for Women and Hollywood at Indiewire, Susan Wloszczyna celebrates the longevity of Sandra Bullock’s career arc. When you look at where she started and now, where she’s landed with Gravity you can’t help but marvel at the ways she’s redefining not only her career but the potential trajectory for actresses over 40 in Hollywood.

Last year’s Zero Dark Thirty made $95 million, and eventually took the number one spot at the box office when it opened wide and was headed straight for the Oscar race before it was hit with controversy. But to understand the kind of tiny revolution happening here one must set aside that controversy for the moment and look only at the success of that film. Let’s also forget it was directed by a woman because that, too, is beside the point.

What is to the point with Zero Dark Thirty is that a film with a woman in the lead, making the decisions, having the whole plot turn around her character is the kind of thing Hollywood has to be talked into. Maybe it seemed like a one-off last year. You could say that the subject matter — killing Bin Laden — was enough to drive the box office. But either way, the facts are the facts: a film with a woman in the lead who wasn’t naked, having sex, someone’s mother, wife or girlfriend was kicking ass and taking names.

(…)Jessica Chastain had two number one movies last year — Zero Dark Thirty and Mama. These examples disprove the notion that movies starring women don’t open, don’t make money or aren’t awards bait. They can be. They are. Originally, the studio that had Gravity wanted a man to star in it, not a woman. But Cuaron stuck to the idea that it had to star a woman and look! It was actually successful! Imagine that.

Perhaps we are entering a new era with fresh minds. How can anyone now say Gravity would have been better cast with a man? It’s 2013 – we’re maybe on the brink of having a woman president for the first time ever. How can the films being made still reinforce the notion that only a guy can do it? Just a thought.

It worth reading the whole article, here at Awards Daily

1
Sep

Jessica Chastain, Channing Tatum and various other Hollywood stars have been featured in a new documentary that will commemorate the 50th death anniversary of John F. Kennedy.

Other celebs to star in the documentary ‘Letters to Jackie,’ include Viola Davis, Anne Hathaway, Michelle Williams, Betty White and Zooey Deschanel, the New York Post reported.

The actors, who will be seen reading 20 letters out of over 800,000 condolence letters sent to his widow, Jackie Onassis, will be joined by filmmaker Bill Couturie at the documentary’s premiere at the Kennedy Presidential Library on September 17 in Boston.

28
Jul

Starring Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy (and subtitled “Her” and “Him”), the two films tell of a young couple that falls in and out of love. Some of the scenes are unique to each film — McAvoy’s character may be seen talking about the relationship with a buddy in “Him”; Chastain’s character could open up to a friend in “Her.”

Many scenes, though, are common to both movies — they’re just shaded differently depending on whose movie you’re watching. So a word, a glance or a detail will look different, coming up as McAvoy might imagine it in “Him” than it would as Chastain sees it in “Her.”

Essentially, he’s taken the scalpel of literary subjectivity to the rich fodder of a relatable couple. By the time you’ve finished watching both movies, Benson hopes, you’ll have a complete if complicated picture of the relationship. Think, perhaps, of the multiple-voices conceit of “Rashomon,” the double-feature expansiveness of “Che” and the shifting narrative details of “Memento.” The films, which have not yet been bought by a U.S. distributor, are designed to be watched in succession, though in either order.

“What I wanted to capture was that feeling of looking across the table at a couple and trying to understand what their relationship is really like, and how they each experienced that relationship differently, ” Benson said in an interview.

Read the whole interview at LA Times



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